In the news

Linking you to articles and reports featuring work and organisational psychologists who are helping translate the science into policy and practice

 
Making Chocolate Teapots: Striving for 'Good' Youth Work Policy Briefs Launch

29 September 2021

At the end of November, join our webinar talk/panel debate.

 

We will be considering the disproportionately negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on youth employment opportunities and the heightened importance of career guidance for securing work in such uncertain labour market conditions.

This event will be of interest to anyone who has an interest in improving youth employment, including policy-makers involved in education, skills and labour market policies.

The Living Wage: Showcasing the latest cutting edge research

23 September 2021

Our webinar on 18 November launches the European Journal of Work and Organisational Psychology’s special issue on living wages, and the EAWOP & ESRC Impact Accelerator Living Wage game.

Workers from marginalized and vulnerable groups have been struck hardest by the Covid-19 pandemic. Our webinar links to an EAWOP’s special issue on living wages.

Silence is golden?

23 September 2021

“Silence is golden” they say, however, work & organisational psychological (WOP) science shows that it can also be dangerous for individuals, organisations and society when people do not feel able to express or actively withhold information and concerns. 

 

Our webinar on 30 November explores why silence in organisations can be far from a good thing, why it occurs, how to detect and remedy its unintended consequences.

EAWOP Living Wage animation now in Polish, Thai, German, Filipino 

13 September 2021

Today we’ve uploaded onto our YouTube channel Polish, Thai, German, Filipino versions of our Living Wage animation.

 

It not only distills why living wages matter to individuals, their families, their employers and wider society, but it now distills it into other languages.

 

We’ve even added subtitles!

Reference list added for "Why do good people do bad things?" 

9 June 2021

The science behind the EAWOPii "Why do good people do bad things?" threats & securities animation.

New publication added on Young People’s Work, Employment and Careers

8 June 2021

A special issue of the EAWOP Practitioner's E-Journal on Young People's Work, Employment and Careers.

This Special Issue features a mix of full-length empirical papers and stakeholder interviews focusing on key themes related to youth employment, a global social and economic challenge. 

EAWOP Living Wage animation now in Romanian, Portuguese and Mandarin

1 June 2021

Today we’ve uploaded onto our YouTube channel, Romanian, Portuguese and Mandarin versions of our Living Wage animation.

 

It not only distills why living wages matter to individuals, their families, their employers and wider society, but it now distills it into other languages.

 

We’ve even added subtitles!

EAWOP Living Wage animation now in Spanish and French

21 May 2021

Today we’ve uploaded onto our YouTube channel, Spanish and French versions of our Living Wage animation.

 

It not only distills why living wages matter to individuals, their families, their employers and wider society, but it now distills it into French and Spanish.

 

We’ve even added subtitles!

Living Wage Animation launch event “great success” 

18 May 2021

EAWOPii's first event on 11 May attracted an enthusiastic reception, with 45 attendees from 13 countries enjoying the first presentation of our eagerly anticipated Living Wage animation. 

EAWOP launch their first animation

11 May 2021

EAWOP launch their first animation, translating science about living wages and their impact on people & employers.

Report: Learning From COVID-19

April 2021

A Professional Standards Authority case-study review of the initial crisis response of 10 UK health and social care professional regulators in 2020.

Report: SARS-CoV-2: testing & workplace

16 February 2021

The UK Health and Safety Executive Workplace Health Expert Committee (WHEC) was asked to consider the role of SARS-CoV-2 testing as part of a risk mitigation strategy in a workplace setting. The main types of detection assay are described and the differences between evidence of “infection” and “infectivity” are highlighted. The issues of sensitivity, specifcity and predictive values of tests are discussed together with the impact on those measures of sampling quality and levels of community transmission. The delay between sampling and receiving results is a signifcant practical issue in the workplace and, in general, there is a trade-off between speed and accuracy.

Living wages and COVID-19

11 November 2020

Work should lift people out of poverty - but, increasingly, those in low-paid jobs are suffering as much as the unemployed. The Living Wage offers a solution. It is a wage sufficient to live a decent standard of life, independent of welfare and other public subsidies. While some have previously argued that living wages distort labour markets and increase organisational costs, our review offers an alternative perspective.

How EAWOPii started

November 2020

In 2019 at the bi-annual EAWOP conference in Turin, the EAWOP General Meeting decided to develop a unit with the goal of informing and underpinning European policy development regarding people, work and organization based on the science and practice of Work and Organizational psychology.


The EAWOP impact incubator started in November 2020, with the appointment of its inaugural Director, Prof Rosalind Searle. She is responsible for developing this new strategic and policy focused area for EAWOP.

Report: Evaluating interventions in work-related ill health and disease

November 2020

Evaluation of interventions in the workplace, intended to reduce the risk of ill health caused by hazards, both physical and psychological, is needed if what works is to be distinguished from what does not and undesirable, yet unforeseen, consequences are to be recognised.

 

This paper discusses different types of interventions and the methods whereby their effectiveness may be tested.

 

There is a focus on the difficulties of evaluating interventions that comprise several dimensions and on those that may be highly context-specific and of limited generalisability.